the clothesline project

politics

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Awareness of sexual violence in the long shadows of the Orlando Massacre and the Stanford Rape Case is essential. Read on to learn of small things being done & for helpful resources that can be utilized to prevent sexual violence in the future.

April was Sexual Assault Awareness Month, as you might’ve known from newspapers, web journals or BuzzFeed. At my school, it’s taken very seriously (as it should at all universities).

Each year, volunteers from every department of our school spend innumerable hours to put up the shirts seen above on clotheslines, spread throughout our campus.

Why do we do this?

If you’ll look very closely, each shirt has a message, written or illustrated. Each shirt is a memorial for a particular survivor of sexual violence.

Each color represents a different type of violence, and as you’ll see, there is a wide spectrum of colors.

I go to a women’s college, and many of the shirts seen here are from my school. There are also shirts from inmates at nearby women’s prisons; the term project for two social studies classes is to visit the prisons to provide supplies for shirt-making for the inmates.

The Clothesline Project has been a tradition at my school for about a decade, though it’s been going on nationally and internationally for much longer.

– – –

The resources featured here from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center & the Human Rights Campaign:

Directory of Allied Organizations

Healthy Sexuality Resources

Sexual Violence Prevention on College Campuses

Engaging Bystanders

 Awareness and Prevention in the LGBTQ Community

Here’s to a safer school year.

x. Carey

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